Bergen County Ended Chronic Homelessness, So Can Every Other Community

Learn more about homelessness as a social justice issue at the next forum.

Sunday, January 13 at 2:30 pm, El Paso Public Library downtown.

“This is not easy work. You must be able to work in the interest of people who will test your ability to care for them. These are the ones who need us the most.”(Photo:  Garry Knight /cc/flickr)

“This is not easy work. You must be able to work in the interest of people who will test your ability to care for them. These are the ones who need us the most.”(Photo: Garry Knight/cc/flickr)

This article published on 12/28/18 by Common Dreams: ‘When I signed up to attend a symposium on Ending Homelessness in Newark, New Jersey on November 25th of this year the best I was expecting to hear was a much needed morale boosting pep rally for those of us who have experienced homelessness and are working on the front lines of this seemingly intractable situation.

Why?

Chief among my reasons for feeling so despairing about ever ending homelessness is the fickle and careless way most social service agencies I’ve encountered function in relation to the people who come to them for emergency housing services. Here are just a couple of examples. In order to receive emergency assistance an applicant must provide proof that no one in their family is declaring them a dependent on their tax forms. Many young homeless are homeless because they are estranged from their families and not on speaking  terms. Applicants for emergency housing assistance must also prove that they are not eligible for unemployment benefits. If you are, and even if those benefits don’t amount to enough to pay rent and live on, you are nevertheless turned down for emergency assistance.” Continue Reading