1918 Texas Ranger Massacre Reveals Extreme Violence Against Mexicans along the U.S.-Mexico Border a Century Ago

 A family photo shows Arlinda Valencia’s grandfather, Rosendo Mesa, left, and great-grandfather, Longino Flores, right, in Porvenir, Texas. Longino Flores was among the 15 men and boys killed in the 1918 massacre.

A family photo shows Arlinda Valencia’s grandfather, Rosendo Mesa, left, and great-grandfather, Longino Flores, right, in Porvenir, Texas. Longino Flores was among the 15 men and boys killed in the 1918 massacre.

From the El Paso Times:

AUSTIN — It has been 100 years since 15 unarmed men and boys from a small border town south of Marfa were executed in the middle of night.

“Men were dragged from their beds, and, without having been given time to dress, were led away in their night clothes to the edge of the settlement, where they were shot to death by the posse,” reads an El Paso Morning Times article published on Feb. 8, 1918, almost two weeks after the massacre. “The bodies of the men were found the next day where they had fallen, riddled with bullets.” 

They were killed after a group of Texas Rangers, U.S. Army cavalry soldiers and local ranchers descended on their village, Porvenir, seeking revenge for a deadly attack at a nearby ranch a month earlier — although there was no evidence tying the villagers to it. Continue reading